Posted by: outsiderart1 | October 21, 2010

Museum of Everything: Exhibition 3 is now open!!

On Wednesday 13th October 2010, The Museum of Everything returned to London with Exhibition #3. Sir Peter Blake is the collaborator for this exhibition, revelaing many of his discoveries from across the world for the first time. A series of events happened during Frieze Art week within the MOE, and I am guessing, as with exhibition 1, that many other events will happen during its time, which i will post on here.

Featured Artists in the new exhibition include ….

John, Anna and Joby Carter

Ex-stock car racer John Carter and wife Anna turned their steamy passion into Carter’s legendary Victorian steam funfair which still spends its summers at the seaside under the gleeful eye of showman decorator son, Joby.

Cheeta

The Meisner-trained performing chimpanzee and supporting star of Tarzan movies, who parted ways with Johnny Weissmuller, retired to Palm Springs, took up painting at the age of 64 and was eventually displayed in the National Gallery.

Fred Johnson

The universally acclaimed king of the sideshow banner, Johnson’s panoply of larger-than-life characters includes performing midgets, sexy mermaids, gentle giants and bearded ladies, all portrayed in brilliant primaries on massive sheets of canvas cloth.

Annie Jones

Hirsutism was the calling card of Annie Jones, a gentle lady whose sideburns and facial hair brought her to the attention of PT Barnum and who became not only the most famous bearded lady in the world but a champion for equality amongst circus performers.

Walter Potter

The acclaimed master of Victorian taxidermy whose lifetime’s journey was a tiny West Sussex museum, filled with dioramas of deceased woodland creatures in his brilliantly imagined schools, gentleman’s clubs, nursery rhymes and fantasies.

Albert Schäfer

The legendary European impresario who brought his troupe of 30 performing midgets to England during the war, toured as a musical act featuring handmade props, gags and posters and built an entire room of stamps at the end of Worthing Pier.

Jack Sigler

Together with father Clarence, Jack Sigler rose to become one of the top side show banner painters in his own right.

General Tom Thumb

The son of a Connecticut carpenter, Charles Sherwood Stratton rose to become the world’s most famous and most wealthy circus dwarf under the tutelage of his mentor, friend and boss, the acclaimed ringmaster PT Barnum.

Harry Varnum

Varnum was a vaudeville vanguard, AKA Bafflus, AKA Renaud, who toured Great Britain with his wife and partner Maisie, entertaining the war generation with his delightful handmade Punch and Judy puppets, marionettes and figurines.

HC Westermann

Former US Marine, circus performer and self-taught artist, whose flamboyant anti-war output included intricate carvings and colourful woodcuts, finally revealed to a generalist audience at his Whitney Museum retrospective in 1987.

Norah Wellings

Chad Valley doll designer in the 1920s who started creating her own range of idiosyncratic soft toys, dolls and teddy bears modelled after stars like Shirley Temple and Josephine Baker and sold on cruise ships across the globe.

Ted Willcox

A mild-mannered chain-smoking ex-serviceman, whose World War Two injuries led him to create an embroidered therapy of pin-up girls and cosmic mythologies, all  in the privacy of his tiny London flat.

Arthur Windley

A retired farmer from Norfolk whose astonishing assembly of miniature fairgrounds were built for his own amusement and remained secret in his garage for forty years, revealed only to friends, family and legions of local schoolchildren.

Check the link for more info:: http://www.museumofeverything.com/exhibition3.php#press

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